How Hormone Replacement Therapy Can Treat Your Menopausal Symptoms

How Hormone Replacement Therapy Can Treat Your Menopausal Symptoms

We’ve all felt the pang of panic when the low fuel light comes on the dashboard. Your car is only a few miles from being totally empty, and if you don’t fill up quickly, you won’t get much further. 

The same happens to your body when menopause sets in and you run low on hormones. Instead of a dashboard warning, you get hot flashes, night sweats, and other embarrassing problems. If only there was a hormone station you could go to for a refill. 

Actually, there is. This is where hormone replacement therapy comes in. 

At Progressive Women’s Health in Friendswood, Texas, our patients have seen significant improvements in their menopausal symptoms by undergoing hormone replacement therapy. In this blog, Asia Mohsin, MD, shows you exactly how it can help you get back to feeling like yourself. 

Understanding hormone replacement therapy

The magic of hormone replacement therapy is right in its name. This powerful treatment relieves your symptoms by replacing the hormones you’ve lost due to menopause. There are two general ways you can take hormone replacement therapy: systemic products and nonsystematic products. Here’s a closer look at each. 

Systemic products

This type of hormone replacement therapy involves delivering hormones directly into your bloodstream so they circulate to all parts of your body. Usually, they come in an oral tablet, patch, gel, spray, or injection. We recommend this type if you complain of hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal symptoms, and/or osteoporosis.

Nonsystemic products

On the other hand, nonsystemic products target only a specific or localized area of your body, namely your vagina. Menopause often wreaks havoc on your vaginal health, causing dryness, itchiness, and painful sex. 

Our lineup of systemic and nonsystemic products includes:

Depending on your needs, symptoms, and preferences, we help you decide which combination of hormone replacement therapy methods will work best for you. 

We also discuss ways to further improve your health, such as how to eat better and exercise more. 

More benefits of hormone replacement therapy

Yes, hormone replacement therapy is an effective treatment for menopause, but that’s not all it can do. It may also reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis, improve your mood and mental health, prevent tooth loss, relieve joint pain, and even mitigate your risk of developing colon cancer and diabetes. 

If you’re suffering from symptoms caused by menopause, we can help you feel like yourself again. To see if hormone replacement therapy could help you, call 281-626-7694 or book an appointment online with Progressive Women’s Health today. We also offer telehealth visits.

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